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Aug 5, 2012

Tokelau Will Be World's First 100% Solar Powered Nation by September




Tokelau Will Be World's First 100% Solar Powered Nation by September

Tokelau may not yet be a fully self-governing country—the major of its budget is paid for in aid from New Zealand; its citizens still are technically citizens of New Zealand; and it has non-self-governing territory status with the UN—but its may well become the world's nation of island to get all of its electricity from solar power.
As New Zealand's 3 News reports (ht Revmodo), the three atolls that make up Tokelau are in the process of phasing out using diesel fuel to generate electricity, installing over 4000 solar panels as replacement. The first of the atolls to get solar panels is about halfway towards having all of them installed, with the remaining panels expected to be installed by September.
Here's the amazing connection between phasing out diesel fueled electricity, getting the Tokelau budget inline and untying the connection to New Zealand:
The nation's annual revenues are under $500,000, but the national budget is $2.8 million. (Yes, million dollars, which gives you a sense of both how financially strapped and small the place is.)
Currently, diesel powered electricity costs the nation over $1 million a year (roughly $715 per person, with per capita purchasing power of a bit over $1000, though the newest data is well over a decade old). Even though it's going to cost $7.5 million to install all the solar panels—the money is coming from New Zealand's government—after the system is paid off, the panels will still have nearly two
                                                                               home

Jun 15, 2012

Blood Pressure(anroid app)



Free

Blood Pressure Blood Pressure(anroid app)

crazytechnoz rank-08 
 WHAT IS THE BLOOD PRESURE:
Blood pressure (BP) is the pressure exerted by circulating blood upon the walls of blood vessels, and is one of the principal vital signs. When used without further specification, "blood pressure" usually refers to the arterial pressure of the systemic circulation. During each heartbeat, blood pressure varies between a maximum (systolic) and a minimum (diastolic) pressure.[1] The blood pressure in the circulation is principally due to the pumping action of the heart.[2] Differences in mean blood pressure are responsible for blood flow from one location to another in the circulation. The rate of mean blood flow depends on the resistance to flow presented by the blood vessels. Mean blood pressure decreases as the circulating blood moves away from the heart through arteries, capillaries and veins due to viscous losses of energy. Mean blood pressure drops over the whole circulation, although most of the fall occurs along the small arteries and arterioles.[3] Gravity affects blood pressure via hydrostatic forces (e.g., during standing) and valves in veins, breathing, and pumping from contraction of skeletal muscles also influence blood pressure in veins.[2]
The measurement blood pressure without further specification usually refers to the systemic arterial pressure measured at a person's upper arm and is a measure of the pressure in the brachial artery, major artery in the upper arm. A person’s blood pressure is usually expressed in terms of the systolic pressure over diastolic pressure and is measured in millimetres of mercury (mmHg), for example 140/90.


app detais and working:

"Turn your Android phone to a personal blood pressure monitoring machine."This is an application for recording your blood pressure (BP). BP varies during a day, we need to record several times a day.We can set goal BP and check chart and graph of BP by using this application.
Column A of the exported csv file is "UNIX TIMESTAMP".
How to convert:
( MAC Numbers )
"=DATE(1970, 1, 1) + (Value of column "A")/60/60/24"
Latest version: 1.4.5 (for Android version 2.1 and higher)
(2 likes, 0 dislikes)
User reviews of Blood Pressure


to download:click here to download. downloads:425

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The Skinny on Dietary Fats

The Skinny on Dietary Fats
Bad Fats
a)
Trans fats Most are created when manufacturers turn liquid oils into more solid fat like shortening and margarine. Trans fats raise LDL cholesterol.
b)
Saturated fats This occurs naturally in all fatty foods, but mostly in dairy products, meats and tropical oils like palm and coconut. Saturated fats raises both LDL ("lousy") and HDL ("healthy") cholesterol.

Better Fats
a)
Polyunsaturated fats (corn, soy and sunflower) These fats lower cholesterol levels.
b)
Monounsaturated fats (canola and olive) These fats tend to lower cholesterol and may help the body maintain proper levels of HDL-C ("Healthy") cholesterol.

Best Fats

Omega 3s This is a polyunsaturated fatty acid found in high amounts in flax seeds (picture at right), English walnuts and in seafood, especially higher fat, cold-water varieties like tuna, salmon, sardines and mackerel. They may prevent blood platelets from sticking to artery walls, which lowers the risk for blocked blood vessels and heart attacks. How fish oils work isn't certain but the leading theory is: When the heart muscle is stressed, the fish fat stabilizes the heart cells which allows the heart to beat regularly. When there is trouble, EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) is released from the cell membrane and it suppresses the extra beats. The omega 3 fatty acids restores a balance disrupted by excessive consumption of omega-6 fatty acids and saturated fats. Omega 3s can also help to lower blood triglycerides.
 
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What is Body Mass Index?

What is Body Mass Index?
This is a measurement of body fat using a calculation of your height and your weight.
If you are less active, body fat gradually replaces muscle. Extra body fat increases the risk for heart disease.
What is your BMI?

BMI
Classification
<19
Underweight*
19-25
Healthy range
25-29.9
Overweight
30-39.9
Obese
>40
Morbidly obese
*Underweight does not necessarily mean unhealthy!


BMI alone is not diagnostic. It is one of many risk factors for developing a chronic disease (such as heart disease, cancer and diabetes). As a person's BMI increases the risk for many diseases increases as well.
Other factors that may be important to look at when assessing your risk for chronic disease include:
  • Diet
  • Physical Activity
  • Waist Circumference
  • Blood Pressure
  • Blood Sugar Level
  • Cholesterol Level
  • Family History of Disease

To calculate your BMI:

Your BMI = Your weight (in kg) ÷ Your height2 (in meters2)

Or you can use the following table...
BMI
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
Height
(inches)
Body Weight (pounds)
4’11"
94
99
104
109
114
119
124
128
133
138
143
148
153
158
163
168
173
5’0"
97
102
107
112
118
123
128
133
138
143
148
153
158
163
168
174
179
5’1"
100
106
111
116
122
127
132
137
143
148
153
158
164
169
174
180
185
5’2"
104
109
115
120
126
131
136
142
147
153
158
164
169
175
180
186
191
5’3"
107
113
118
124
130
135
141
146
152
158
163
169
175
180
186
191
197
5’4"
110
116
122
128
134
140
145
151
157
163
169
174
180
186
192
197
204
5’5"
114
120
126
132
138
144
150
156
162
168
174
180
186
192
198
204
210
5’6"
118
124
130
136
142
148
155
161
167
173
179
186
192
198
204
210
216
5’7"
121
127
134
140
146
153
159
166
172
178
185
191
198
204
211
217
223
5’8"
125
131
138
144
151
158
164
171
177
184
190
197
203
210
216
223
230
5’9"
128
135
142
149
155
162
169
176
182
189
196
203
209
216
223
230
236
5’10"
132
139
146
153
160
167
174
181
188
195
202
209
216
222
229
236
243
5’11"
136
143
150
157
165
172
179
186
193
200
208
215
222
229
236
243
250
6’0"
140
147
154
162
169
177
184
191
199
206
213
221
228
235
242
250
258
6’1"
144
151
159
166
174
182
189
197
204
212
219
227
235
242
250
257
265
6’2"
148
155
163
171
179
186
194
202
210
218
225
233
241
249
256
264
272
6’3"
152
160
168
176
184
192
200
208
216
224
232
240
248
256
264
272
279
                           



CAUTION!
BMI calculations are not valid for children under 18 years of age, or for muscular people or athletes. Someone who is very strong but lean will still weigh a lot. Their BMI will therefore be high, but they are not obese!

 

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance



What is Insulin Resistance?

Normal Person
After a meal there is a rise in blood glucose in the body. This stimulates the pancreas to secrete insulin. Insulin attaches to the insulin receptors on the cell surface and enables the glucose to enter muscle and fat cells where it is stored or burned for energy.

Insulin Resistance
The pancreas secretes sufficient insulin but the body is resistant to the insulin. To compensate, the pancreas secretes more and more insulin. The excess insulin manages to keep the blood glucose within the upper limit of the normal range, so diabetes does not occur. However, the high insulin levels lead to high triglyceride levels, low good cholesterol (HDL-C), high blood pressure, and all signs of metabolic syndrome. This raises the risk for heart attack. In this case, the fasting blood glucose may be between 6.0 and 7.0 mmol/L (impaired fasting glucose) or blood sugar levels may rise to high levels after meals.
Insulin resistance is caused in a large part by weight gain, especially around the middle. It can be worsened by the over-consumption of refined carbohydrates, such as bread, pastas, and sugary foods. Weight reduction can result in a 30%-60% improvement in insulin sensitivity. 


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Jun 14, 2012

Type 2 Diabetes in Children

Type 2 Diabetes in Children

Is this topic for you?
This topic provides information about type 2 diabetes in children. If you are looking for information about type 1 diabetes, see the topic Type 1 Diabetes: Children Living With the Disease.

What is type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is a lifelong disease that develops when the pancreas cannot make enough insulin or when the body's tissues cannot use insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body’s cells use sugar (glucose) for energy. It also helps the body store extra sugar in muscle, fat, and liver cells.
Without insulin, the sugar cannot get into the cells to do its work. It stays in the blood instead. This can cause high blood sugar levels. A person has diabetes when the blood sugar stays too high too much of the time.
Over time, high blood sugar can cause problems with the eyes, heart, blood vessels, nerves, and kidneys. High blood sugar also makes a person more likely to get serious illnesses or infections.
In the past, doctors believed that type 2 diabetes was an adult disease and that type 1 diabetes was a children’s disease. Now, more and more children are getting type 2 diabetes.
Finding out that your child has diabetes can be scary. But your child can live a long, healthy life by learning to manage the disease.

What causes type 2 diabetes?

Doctors do not know exactly what causes diabetes. Experts believe the main risks for children getting type 2 diabetes are being overweight, not being physically active, and having a family history of the disease.
Also, the hormones released during the early teen years make it harder than usual for the body to use insulin correctly. This problem is called insulin resistance. It can lead to diabetes.

What are the symptoms?

Most children with type 2 diabetes do not have symptoms when the disease is first found. If there are symptoms, they usually are mild and may include:
  • Having to urinate more often.
  • Feeling a little more thirsty than normal.
  • Losing a little weight for no clear reason.

How is type 2 diabetes diagnosed?

A simple blood test is usually all that is needed to diagnose diabetes. Your child’s doctor may do other blood tests if it is not clear whether your child has type 1 or type 2 diabetes.
A doctor may test your child for diabetes if he or she is overweight, gets little physical activity, or has other risk factors for the disease. A risk factor is anything that increases your chances of having a disease. Some children are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes when they have a blood or urine test for some other reason.

How is it treated?

The key to treating diabetes is to keep your child’s blood sugar levels within a target range. To do this:
  • Keep track of your child’s blood sugar levels. This will help you and your child learn how different foods and activities affect his or her blood sugar. Your doctor can teach you and your child how to do this.
  • Teach your child to make healthy food choices.
    • Help your child to eat about the same amount of carbohydrate at each meal. This helps keep your child’s blood sugar steady. Carbohydrate affects blood sugar more than other nutrients. It is found in sugar and sweets, grains, fruit, starchy vegetables, and milk and yogurt.
    • Talk to your doctor, a diabetes educator, or a dietitian about an eating plan that will work for your child. There are many ways to manage how much and when your child eats.
  • Help your child stay active. Your child does not have to start a strict exercise program, but being more active can help control blood sugar. For example, your child could play outside with friends, take walks with family members, or take part in sports.
  • Set a good example. It will be easier for your child if the rest of the family also eats well and gets regular exercise. This may also reduce the risk that other family members will get the disease.
  • If your child needs medicine for diabetes, make sure that he or she takes it as prescribed.
You play a major role in helping your child take charge of his or her diabetes care. Let your child do as much of the care as possible. At the same time, give your child the support and guidance he or she needs.
The longer a person has diabetes, the more likely he or she is to have problems, such as diseases of the eyes, heart, blood vessels, nerves, and kidneys. But if your child can control his or her blood sugar levels every day, it may help to delay the start of or prevent some of these problems later on.
Even when you are careful and do all the right things, your child can have problems with high or low blood sugar. It is important to know what signs to look for and what to do if this happens.

Can type 2 diabetes be prevented?

Helping your child stay at a healthy weight and get regular exercise can help prevent type 2 diabetes.


 

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes - Topic Overview

 


What is type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes happens when your body can't use insulin the right way or when the pancreas camera can't make enough insulin.
Insulin is a hormone that helps the body's cells use sugar (glucose) for energy. It also helps the body store extra sugar in muscle, fat, and liver cells. Without insulin, this sugar can't get into your cells to do its work. It stays in your blood instead. Your blood sugar level then gets too high.
High blood sugar can harm many parts of the body, such as the eyes, heart, blood vessels, nerves, and kidneys camera. It can also increase your risk for other health problems (complications).
Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system destroys the cells that release insulin, so that over time the body can't produce insulin at all. In type 2 diabetes, the body still makes some insulin, but it can't use it the right way.

What causes type 2 diabetes?

You can get type 2 diabetes if:
  • Your body doesn't respond as it should to insulin. This makes it hard for your cells to get sugar from the blood for energy. This is called insulin resistance.
  • Your pancreas doesn't make enough insulin.
If you are overweight, get little or no exercise, or have type 2 diabetes in your family, you are more likely to have problems with the way insulin works in your body. Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed with a healthy lifestyle, including staying at a healthy weight, making healthy food choices, and getting regular exercise.

What are the symptoms?

Some people don't have symptoms, especially when diabetes is diagnosed early. This is because the blood sugar level may rise so slowly that a person may not know that anything is wrong.
The most common symptoms of high blood sugar include:
  • Feeling very thirsty.
  • Urinating more often than usual.
  • Feeling very hungry.
  • Having blurred vision.
You can get high blood sugar for many reasons, including not taking your diabetes medicines, eating more than usual (especially sweets), not exercising, or being sick or under a lot of stress.
If you're taking insulin or oral diabetes medicine, you can also have problems with low blood sugar. These symptoms include:
  • Sweating.
  • Feeling weak.
  • Feeling shaky.
  • Feeling very hungry.

How is type 2 diabetes diagnosed?

If your doctor thinks that you have type 2 diabetes, he or she will ask you questions about your medical history, do a physical exam, and order a blood test that measures the amount of sugar in your blood.

How is it treated?

The key to treating type 2 diabetes is to keep blood sugar levels controlled and in your target range.

All of the following help to lower blood sugar:
  • Eating healthy foods.
  • Losing weight, if you are overweight.
  • Getting regular exercise.
  • Taking medicines, if you need them.
It's also important to:
  • See your doctor. Regular checkups are important to monitor your health.
  • Test your blood sugar levels. You have a better chance of keeping your blood sugar in your target range if you know what your levels are from day to day.
  • Keep high blood pressure and high cholesterol under control. This can help you lower your risk of heart and large blood vessel disease.
  • Quit smoking. This can help you reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke.
It seems like a lot to do-especially at first. You might start with one or two changes. Focus on checking your blood sugar regularly and being active more often. Work on other tasks as you can.
It can be hard to accept that you have diabetes. It's normal to feel sad or angry. You may even feel grief. Talking about your feelings can help. Your doctor or other health professionals can help you cope. 


Type 1 Diabetes


Type 1 Diabetes - Topic Overview


Is this topic for you?

This topic has general information about type 1 diabetes for people who do not have the disease. If you want to learn how to manage type 1 diabetes, one of the following topics may meet your needs:
  • Type 1 Diabetes: Recently Diagnosed, if you have been told recently that you or your child has type 1 diabetes.
  • Type 1 Diabetes: Living With the Disease, if you or your child age 12 or older has type 1 diabetes. If you have not read the topic Type 1 Diabetes: Recently Diagnosed, you may want to read it first.
  • Type 1 Diabetes: Children Living With the Disease, if your child age 11 or younger has type 1 diabetes. If you have not read the topic Type 1 Diabetes: Recently Diagnosed, you may want to read it first.
  • Type 1 Diabetes: Living With Complications, if you have complications, such as eye, kidney, heart, nerve, or blood vessel disease caused by diabetes.
If you are looking for information about type 2 diabetes, see the topic Type 2 Diabetes.

What is type 1 diabetes?

Type 1 diabetes is a disease that starts when the pancreas camera stops making insulin. Insulin lets blood sugar-also called glucose-enter the body's cells to be used for energy. Without insulin, the cells can't get the sugar they need, and too much sugar builds up in the blood.
Diabetes can cause sudden or long-term problems. If the body doesn't have enough insulin and the blood sugar gets very high, a sudden and very serious problem called diabetic ketoacidosis can happen. This can be deadly. Over time, high blood sugar can damage the eyes, heart, blood vessels, nerves, and kidneys.
Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age, but it usually starts in children or young adults. That's why it used to be called juvenile diabetes.
Type 1 diabetes is different from type 2 diabetes, which is the most common form of the illness. In type 1, the body stops making insulin. In type 2, the body does not make enough insulin, or the body can't use insulin the right way. All people with type 1 diabetes need to take insulin. Some people with type 2 diabetes also need insulin, but most people can use diet, exercise, and medicine in pills to treat that illness.
There isn't a cure for type 1 diabetes. But with treatment, people can live long and healthy lives.

What causes type 1 diabetes?

The body makes insulin in beta cells, which are in a part of the pancreas called the islet (say "EYE-let") tissue. Type 1 diabetes starts because the body destroys the beta cells. Experts don't know why this happens.

Some people have a greater chance of getting type 1 diabetes, because they have a parent, brother, or sister who has it. But most people with the illness don't have a family history of it.

Other things that increase the risk of getting type 1 diabetes are being white and having islet cell antibodies in the blood.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms of diabetes are:
  • Being very thirsty.
  • Urinating a lot.
  • Losing weight without trying.
  • Being hungrier than usual (sometimes).
  • Blurry eyesight.
These symptoms usually appear over a few days to weeks. Sometimes people notice symptoms after an illness, such as the flu. They may think that the diabetes symptoms are because of the flu, so they don't seek medical care soon enough.
If a person waits too long to get medical care, he or she may get symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis. Symptoms of this problem include:
  • Flushed, hot, dry skin.
  • Not feeling hungry.
  • Belly pain.
  • Vomiting.
  • A strong, fruity breath odor.
  • Fast and shallow breathing.
  • Restlessness, drowsiness, or trouble waking up.
  • Confusion.

How is type 1 diabetes diagnosed?

A doctor asks questions about the person's health and does a physical exam. A blood test measures the person's glucose.
Some people are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes because they have symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis.

How is it treated?

Treatment for type 1 diabetes focuses on keeping blood sugar levels within a target range. A person with type 1 diabetes needs to:
  • Take insulin through daily shots or an insulin pump.
  • Eat a healthy diet that spreads carbohydrate throughout the day.
  • Check blood sugar levels several times a day.
  • Get regular exercise.
When a small child has diabetes, the parents have the responsibility for blood sugar control. As the child grows, he or she can take over more of the diabetes care.
Treatment may change based on the results of daily home blood sugar tests and other tests or exams.

Can type 1 diabetes be prevented?

There is no way to prevent type 1 diabetes. But studies are being done to find ways to prevent or delay diabetes in people who are most likely to get it.
Tight control of blood sugar and blood pressure can help people with type 1 diabetes prevent or delay problems with their eyes, kidneys, heart, blood vessels, and nerves.


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How to Test Your Blood Sugar at Home


How to Test Your Blood Sugar at Home





content provided by Healthwise
Monitoring your blood sugar level at home takes the guesswork out of your daily diabetes care. You will know what your blood sugar level is at the time of testing. Here is a simple way to get started.

Get organized

Before you start testing your blood sugar:
  • Talk with your doctor about how often and when you should test your blood sugar. Record this information on the blood sugar testing times form Click here to view a form. (What is a PDF document?).
  • Link testing your blood sugar with other daily activities, such as preparing breakfast. This will help you establish the habit of self-testing.
  • Use the list of supplies to gather the things you need to test your blood sugar. Keep your supplies together so that you can do a test quickly if needed.
  • Check your equipment before you do each test.
    • Check the expiration date on your testing strips. If you use expired test strips, you may not get accurate results.
    • Make sure the code numbers on the testing strips bottle match the numbers on your meter. If the numbers do not match, follow the directions that come with your meter for changing the code numbers.
  • The first time you use a meter, and every time you switch meters, check the accuracy of your meter's results. Use the sugar control solution that is made by your meter's manufacturer. Follow the directions that came with your meter for using the control solution properly.
  • At regular intervals, properly care for your equipment. Put a copy of the care of blood sugar supplies with your bag or kit as a reminder.

Do the test

Some people with diabetes test their blood sugar rarely or not at all. Other people—such as pregnant women—test it several times a day. The more often you test your blood sugar, the more you will know about how well your treatment is keeping your blood sugar levels within a target range.
Follow these steps when testing your blood sugar:
  1. Wash your hands with warm, soapy water, and dry them well with a clean towel.
  2. Put a clean needle (lancet) in the lancet device. The lancet device is a pen-sized holder for the lancet. It holds and positions the lancet and controls how deeply the lancet goes into your skin.
  3. Get a test strip from your bottle of testing strips. Put the lid back on the bottle immediately to prevent moisture from affecting the other strips.
  4. Get your blood sugar meter ready. Follow the manufacturer's instructions for your specific meter.
  5. Use the lancet device to stick the side of your fingertip with the lancet. Some devices and blood sugar meters allow blood testing on other parts of the body, such as the forearm. Be sure you know where your device can be used.
  6. Put a drop of blood on the correct spot of the test strip, covering the test area well.
  7. Using a clean cotton ball, stop the bleeding by applying pressure to the place you stuck.
  8. Wait for the results. Most meters take only a few seconds to give you the results.

Record the results

Recording your blood sugar results is very important. Your doctor will use your record to see how often your blood sugar levels are in your target range. This information lets your doctor know if your medicine (insulin or pills) needs adjusting. Be sure to take your record with you on each visit to your doctor or diabetes educator.
To record your results, you can:
  • Get printed blood sugar logs from companies that make diabetic medicines and supplies. Or use this home blood sugar diary Click here to view a form. (What is a PDF document?).
  • Make a blood sugar log in a notebook. You can record other information in the log or notebook, such as insulin doses, your exercise, and food you have eaten.
  • Use your blood sugar meter, if it is capable. Some blood sugar meters can store from 10 to more than 100 blood sugar results. Some meters are able to calculate your average blood sugar for a period of time, such as over a day or a week. Also, some manufacturers of blood sugar meters make computer programs that use the results from your meter to show patterns in how your blood sugar level changes.
  • Some blood sugar meters connect over the Internet to sites that organize and store your blood sugar results.

Preventing sore fingers

The more often you test your blood sugar, the more likely you are to have sore fingertips. These suggestions can help prevent sore fingers:
  • Do not prick the tip of your finger. If you do, the prick is more painful and you may not get enough blood to get accurate results. Always prick the side of your fingertip. Also, do not prick your toes to get a blood sample. This can increase your risk of developing a dangerous infection in your foot.
  • Don't squeeze your fingertip. If you have trouble getting a drop of blood large enough to cover the test area of the strip, hang your hand down below your waist and count to 5. Then squeeze your finger beginning closest to your hand and moving outward to the end of your finger.
  • Use a different finger each time. Establish a pattern for which finger you stick so that you will not use some fingers more than others. If a finger becomes sore, avoid using it to test your blood sugar for a few days.
  • Use a different device. Some blood sugar meters use lancet devices that can get a blood sample from sites other than the fingers, such as the forearm.
  • Do not reuse the lancet. It can get dull and cause pain.
Test Your Knowledge
  1. To test your blood sugar, put a drop of blood on the special test strip used with your home blood sugar meter.
    1. This answer is Correct
      To test your blood sugar at home, you put a drop of blood on a special test strip. Within seconds to a minute after you place the test strip into the meter, the meter provides the results of your blood sugar test.
    2. This answer Incorrect
      To test your blood sugar at home, you do need to put a drop of blood on a special test strip. Within seconds to a minute after you place the test strip into the meter, the meter provides the results of your blood sugar test.




      HOME 

Jun 13, 2012

CALORIE COUNTER BY FATSECRET ANROID APP

 CALORIE COUNTER BY FATSECRET:

 

 CRAZYTECHNOZ RANK:03

 

Description

A simple tool to find all the Calorie and Nutrition Facts for the foods you eat.Calorie Counter is the essential app to simply find nutritional info for the food you eat and easily keep track of your meals, exercise and weight.
Calorie Counter is simple to use and has all the cool tools to help you succeed:
- A food diary to plan and keep track of what you're eating.
- An exercise diary to record all the calories you burn.
- A barcode scanner and manual barcode input
- A quick pick to find calorie and nutrition info for your favorite foods, brands and restaurants.
- A diet calendar to see your calories consumed and burned.
- A weight tracker.
- A journal to record your progress.
- Recipes and meal ideas
You can also sync your account online to access your info anywhere, any time.
We hope you'll love Calorie Counter. We are constantly working to improve the app so there's plenty more goodies to come ;)
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